Welcome to my Castle.

Mind you, the doors lead anywhere.

6 notes

Angry, profane, and downright rude, this piece of art by Alan Navarra still manages to be eloquent, philosophical and, well, amusing.
Following the shattered thoughts of the fictional Michael Perez, we are privy to his letters of resignation to his various employers and other thoughts. The letters start out courteous, and then, as the book progresses gain momentum in bitterness and grow ever more profane than the last. Included in this collection of bitter thoughts are random thoughts of venom, disdain and disappointment with Michael’s corporate life space.
Most amusing of these collected bits of words are his replies to bogus text messages informing him of having won several hundred thousands of pesos.
What struck me the most however, in this pool of venom and hate, were his doodles portraying, as I perceive it, various states of decay. His doodles are organic and seem to be moving, degrading, and rotting right before the viewer’s eyes. This, of course, adds up to the book’s aura of negativity.
That said, this is not a book to read when you want something to brighten up your day. Although great fun when you’ve just had a very bad day at work or in school. Or you want to have a ready reference for any quick, poisonous reply to anyone who’s pissing you off.
It’s a bit difficult to follow though, with no plot; it’s basically just a collection of embittered resignation letters, thoughts, text messages, all arranged in an interesting post-modern layout. Hence, the three stars. Still, it has a story behind all the words, if one is patient enough to sift through them to find it.
All in all, the book lives up to its name Dumot, which in French means “The Word” and in Hiligaynon meaning, “Vindictiveness.” So, vindictive words. Sounds about right.

Angry, profane, and downright rude, this piece of art by Alan Navarra still manages to be eloquent, philosophical and, well, amusing.

Following the shattered thoughts of the fictional Michael Perez, we are privy to his letters of resignation to his various employers and other thoughts. The letters start out courteous, and then, as the book progresses gain momentum in bitterness and grow ever more profane than the last. Included in this collection of bitter thoughts are random thoughts of venom, disdain and disappointment with Michael’s corporate life space.

Most amusing of these collected bits of words are his replies to bogus text messages informing him of having won several hundred thousands of pesos.

What struck me the most however, in this pool of venom and hate, were his doodles portraying, as I perceive it, various states of decay. His doodles are organic and seem to be moving, degrading, and rotting right before the viewer’s eyes. This, of course, adds up to the book’s aura of negativity.

That said, this is not a book to read when you want something to brighten up your day. Although great fun when you’ve just had a very bad day at work or in school. Or you want to have a ready reference for any quick, poisonous reply to anyone who’s pissing you off.

It’s a bit difficult to follow though, with no plot; it’s basically just a collection of embittered resignation letters, thoughts, text messages, all arranged in an interesting post-modern layout. Hence, the three stars. Still, it has a story behind all the words, if one is patient enough to sift through them to find it.

All in all, the book lives up to its name Dumot, which in French means “The Word” and in Hiligaynon meaning, “Vindictiveness.” So, vindictive words. Sounds about right.

Filed under dumot Alan Navarra book books book review review filipino author pinoy filipino opinion bitter vindictive profane angry doodles

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